METRONEWS
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Snag eating abilities put to the test by ENSOC

Luka Forman
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Two contestants going at it to win the moped.  Luka Forman

It was a bad day to be a snag as 15 contestants ate as many sausages as they could in five minutes for the chance to win a moped.

Canterbury University Engineering Society ENSOC Fleet Manager Ben Gentry said the snag eating competition was a brand new event for the society, and they thought it would be a fun way to use their money. 

"Over the summer we had the idea, let's give away a moped - how should we do it? Snag eating contest. It seemed real random, and I think that was the point of it." 

Contestants were selected randomly for the event, but Ben said some took it more seriously than he thought they would. 

"Everyone's getting a little serious, even though it's a completely fun event - so it could be competitive.'' 

ENSOC member Carolyne Nel added:

"It starts getting serious when you say you've got a moped up for grabs." 

Carolyne said the society had some leftover cash after Covid last year which helped them to fund the event. 

Ben said they bought the cheapest moped they could find, but it still runs just fine. 

He's been using it to get to uni in the meantime. 

On the day a huge crowd gathered to cheer on the contestants. 

Many of the supporters had mates competing and each were sure their friend could eat the most snags. 

In the end James Jester took out the coveted prize eating nine snags in the allotted five minutes. 

"Pretty much, it was just a bad day to be a snag... I love sausages, so I thought I'd just come along and hack as many as I could in 5 minutes," James said.  

He clearly still had more in the tank as he went back for one last snag when the competition was over. 

Ben was stoked with how the event went and said he would be keen to run it again next year. 

"That went brilliantly... the crowd loved it, I can't believe that guy ate nine saussies in five minutes... kind of ridiculous." 

Organisers Ben Gentry and Carolyn Nel tell us about the contest.